A Simple Way to Help the Hurricane Victims

Is your heart aching for those who have been affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma? Mine has. Five years ago, my family and I were fortunately not seriously affected by SuperStorm Sandy, but I know of many people who were not so lucky.

Help the Hurricane Victims

I have donated some money and goods but wanted to do more. So, for a limited time – from now until September 30, – I am donating 30% of all proceeds from all my services: the blog critique service, the proofreading service, and the “pick my brain” service.

Let’s join together in giving some relief to the many people who suffered devastating loss and displacement due to those natural events.

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(Psst: If you are into faith-based journals/planners, 50% of the proceeds of all my books are going to be donated too. Here are the paperback books and the digital ebooks.)

Misused Words: Adverse vs Averse

These words are very similar but there are some slight differences.

Adverse means something that is dangerous, unfavorable, or contrary. It is used with things not people. It is often used in describing the weather.

For example: There may be adverse weather conditions during our vacation.

For example: Certain pharmaceutical drugs can have adverse effects on the body.

Averse means having a strong repugnance or dislike for something.

For example: Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely averse to taking a cruise.

For example: She is not averse to completely revamping her story’s plot.

These two words are a little tricky. Just keep in mind that adverse is used in regards to things, not people. Adverse is never used in relations to people. Averse is most often followed by the word “to.” Also, you know averse is used correctly if you can substitute the work with “opposed” or “dislike.”

In both examples above, you can easily change averse to opposed. “Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely opposed to taking a cruise.” “She is not opposed to completely revamping her story’s plot.”

Next Steps

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For information about my proofreading and coaching services visit the work with me page.

Misused Words: Aloud vs Allowed

In context, you know what these words are but in writing they are often misspelled, so here is a little refresher:

Misused Words Aloud vs Allowed

Aloud means to use the voice or making noise or sound with the voice.

For example: Nathan voiced his opinion aloud.

For example: Ruth likes to read  aloud to the children.

Allowed is the past tense of allow (a verb) which means to permit or give permission to.

For example: The author allowed her fans to get a sneak peek of her upcoming book.

For example: The plugins allowed for greater usability of the website.

That’s it.  🙂

Next Steps

For more grammar and writing tips, tricks, and exclusive content sign up for the email list.

For information about my proofreading and coaching services visit the work with me page.