Misused Words: Die, Die and Dye

I got a distraught text recently from someone who wrote, “I am going to dye!” Of course, it was an exaggeration and I had to smile because this person wrote “dye” instead of “die.” It was probably an autofix or she didn’t bother to check the text before sending. Still, I figure there are people who may genuinely not know the difference so here is a quick breakdown of the difference between the words:

Misused Words: die, die, and dye

Die, as used in the quote above, means end of life. In this case, it is used as a verb.

For example: I don’t want to die from cancer. (Present tense)

For example: My pet died when I was a little girl. (Past tense)

Die is also means a (usually) six-sided cube that is used for board games and other games. In this case, the word is used as a noun.

For example: I will throw the die after Sharon. (Singular)

For example: You may roll the dice next. (Plural)

Dye is the act of giving color to something or someone. In this case, the word is used as a verb.

For example: The hair stylist wants to dye my hair a darker color. (Present tense)

For example: The hair stylist dyed my sister’s hair purple yesterday! (Past tense)

Dye is also the thing itself that gives color to something or someone. In this case, the word is used as a noun.

For example: There are natural materials, such as beets, that make a great dye. (Singular)

For example: How many color dyes do you have? (Plural)

That’s it! That’s not hard to understand, right? For a printable version of this post, subscribe here. Subscribers, go to your private download page.

************

Tweetable: Misused Words: Die, Die and Dye

Grammar Tip: Adjectives vs Adverbs

A Lot of people get confused by adverbs. Are you one of them? In this post I am going to try and explain the purpose and usage of adverbs. However, one cannot talk (or write!) about adverbs without mentioning adjectives because they do similar grammar jobs.

Grammar Tip: Adjectives vs Adverbs

Image by ArtsyBee (2015) via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain

ADJECTIVES

Adjectives are words that modify (describe) nouns*.

For Example: The BROKEN pencil. The OLD typewriter. Allison’s NEWEST book will be released next week.

In these examples, “broken,” “old,” and “newest” are adjectives because they modify (describe) what KIND of pencil, typewriter and book.

ADVERBS

Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives and other adverbs.

For example: Kate ran QUICKLY. The box is QUITE large. Jack writes VERY slowly.

In the above examples of adverbs, “quickly” modifies the verb ran; “quite” modifies the adjective large; and, “very” modifies the adverb “slowly.”
>A good way to pick out adverbs in a sentence is to look for “ly.” However, be careful! Some adjectives (such as lovely) end in “ly” and there are several adverbs that do not end in “ly” such as yet, too, here, quite, so, not, always, less, also, and well (as well as others).

For a printable pdf of this post, subscribe here. Subscribers, go to your private page to download.

*For a little refresher: A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea (such as freedom, love, etc.).

**********

Tweetable: Grammar Tip: Adjectives vs Adverbs

Misused Words: Advice VS Advise

Advice and advise are pretty similar which is why they often get mixed up. The main difference, besides the spelling, is their part of speech.

Advice Vs Advise

Advice is a NOUN that means to offer a suggestion or recommendation.

For example: My advice is that you write 500 words per day. Tom gave Joan a lot of writing advice.

Advise is a VERB that means to give advice or counsel.

For example: I will advise Tom to start writing his article soon. It also means notification. For example: Janice advised Tom that she was finished with her short story.

*********

Tweetable: Misused Words: Advice VS Advise