Misused Words: Adverse vs Averse

These words are very similar but there are some slight differences.

Adverse means something that is dangerous, unfavorable, or contrary. It is used with things not people. It is often used in describing the weather.

For example: There may be adverse weather conditions during our vacation.

For example: Certain pharmaceutical drugs can have adverse effects on the body.

Averse means having a strong repugnance or dislike for something.

For example: Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely averse to taking a cruise.

For example: She is not averse to completely revamping her story’s plot.

These two words are a little tricky. Just keep in mind that adverse is used in regards to things, not people. Adverse is never used in relations to people. Averse is most often followed by the word “to.” Also, you know averse is used correctly if you can substitute the work with “opposed” or “dislike.”

In both examples above, you can easily change averse to opposed. “Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely opposed to taking a cruise.” “She is not opposed to completely revamping her story’s plot.”

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Misused Words: Aloud vs Allowed

In context, you know what these words are but in writing they are often misspelled, so here is a little refresher:

Misused Words Aloud vs Allowed

Aloud means to use the voice or making noise or sound with the voice.

For example: Nathan voiced his opinion aloud.

For example: Ruth likes to read  aloud to the children.

Allowed is the past tense of allow (a verb) which means to permit or give permission to.

For example: The author allowed her fans to get a sneak peek of her upcoming book.

For example: The plugins allowed for greater usability of the website.

That’s it.  🙂

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Misused Words: Affect vs Effect

The misuse of affect and effect is very common. Here is a brief explanation of how to use these words correctly.

Image by ArtsyBee (2015) via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain

Image by ArtsyBee (2015) via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain

Affect is a verb meaning to change or influence.

For Example: Jan’s touching speech affected everyone in the room.

For Example: Zoe does not want to affect anyone’s opinions regarding the proposed membership changes.

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Effect is a noun meaning a cause or result.

For Example: Hiring an editor will have a positive effect on your writing career.

For Example: I couldn’t believe the effect her behavior had on her sister.

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Grammar girl has a great trick for remembering the difference between the two. She calls it the RAVEN trick. This is how she explains it: “Because raven has the letters A-V-E-N in it, and those also stand for Affect: Verb      Effect: Noun (You can read the whole trick here.)

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