What are Homographs?

Remember when I explained the difference between homophones and homonyms? I didn’t want to confuse you by adding homographs into the mix but they are also a source of confusion for people. Therefore, I am going to briefly explain them now.

Image by ArtsyBee (2015) via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain

Image by ArtsyBee (2015) via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain

Homographs are words are DIFFERENT in (sometimes) ORIGIN, MEANING, and (usually) PRONUNCIATION but have the SAME SPELLING.

For example: Wind and wind are homographs. They have a DIFFERENT (but similar) ORIGIN, a DIFFERENT MEANING, and a DIFFERENT PRONUNCIATION but have the SAME SPELLING. (The wind is strong today. Make sure you wInd up the string tightly so it doesn’t fall apart.)

In this example the first wind has the short vowel “i” and the second wind has a long vowel “i”.

It is all about context and clarity so when you proofread your work don’t forget to double-check your homonyms, homophones and homographs!

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