Misused Words: Adverse vs Averse

These words are very similar but there are some slight differences.

Adverse means something that is dangerous, unfavorable, or contrary. It is used with things not people. It is often used in describing the weather.

For example: There may be adverse weather conditions during our vacation.

For example: Certain pharmaceutical drugs can have adverse effects on the body.

Averse means having a strong repugnance or dislike for something.

For example: Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely averse to taking a cruise.

For example: She is not averse to completely revamping her story’s plot.

These two words are a little tricky. Just keep in mind that adverse is used in regards to things, not people. Adverse is never used in relations to people. Averse is most often followed by the word “to.” Also, you know averse is used correctly if you can substitute the work with “opposed” or “dislike.”

In both examples above, you can easily change averse to opposed. “Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely opposed to taking a cruise.” “She is not opposed to completely revamping her story’s plot.”

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Misused Words: Aloud vs Allowed

In context, you know what these words are but in writing they are often misspelled, so here is a little refresher:

Misused Words Aloud vs Allowed

Aloud means to use the voice or making noise or sound with the voice.

For example: Nathan voiced his opinion aloud.

For example: Ruth likes to read  aloud to the children.

Allowed is the past tense of allow (a verb) which means to permit or give permission to.

For example: The author allowed her fans to get a sneak peek of her upcoming book.

For example: The plugins allowed for greater usability of the website.

That’s it.  🙂

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Grammar Basics: The Compound-Complex Sentence

Okay, so far we have gone over the simple sentence, the compound sentence and, the complex sentence. Today we are going to form compound-complex sentences. And guess what, It’s easier than it seems.

Grammar Basics: The Compound-Complex Sentence

mage by Clker-Free-Vector-Images (2014) via Pixabay, CCO Public domain

What is a Compound-complex Sentence?

Simply put, the compound-complex sentence is exactly what it sounds like: the combination of a compound sentence and a complex together into one large sentence.

If you want to be more technical, this is the “official” definition according to one of my former professors:

A compound-complex sentence consists of more than one independent clause and at least one dependent clause. In many cases, you are simply adding a dependent clause to the beginning or end of a compound sentence, or you are adding another independent clause to a complex sentence.”

If you remember, a compound sentence is a sentence that contains two or more independent clauses (a.k.a complete sentences). A complex sentence is a sentence that contains one independent clause and one dependent clause (which usually has a subordinating conjunction). Therefore, all to have to do is put them together to make a compound-complex sentence.

A Couple of Examples

Compound Sentence: I can read for an hour, or I can write for an hour.

Compound-complex sentence: Unless I get interrupted, I can read for an hour, or I can write for an hour.

“I can read for an hour” is an independent clause, “I can write for an hour” is an independent clause, and “Unless I get interrupted” is a dependent clause. So, putting the compound sentence with the dependent clause creates the compound-complex sentence.

Complex sentence: Although time is short, I would like to go to the post office.

Compound-complex sentence: Although time is short, I would like to go to the post office, so I can get the letter mailed out today.

“Although time is short” is the dependent clause, “I would like to go to the post office” is an independent clause, and “I can get the letter mailed out today” is an independent clause. So again, by putting together the complex sentence with another independent clause creates the compound-complex sentence.

The Trick

To make understanding and creating compound-complex sentences (or any sentence, for that matter) is to break it down. Separate the independent clauses from the dependent clauses and examine how and where they fit. Do they make sense on their own? Do they make sense together? If you do this, over time, you will discover that your writing will improve drastically.

And, that is why I have spent the last few weeks going over each sentence type. By going back to the basics and understanding the hows and the whys of a sentence your message will be clearer, more powerful, and more effective in the long run.

Next Steps

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