Misused Words: Forward vs Foreword

From what I’ve seen, the mistakes between forward and foreword is more of a problem of spelling more than understanding but it doesn’t hurt to remind ourselves, right? {smile}

Misused Words: Forward vs Foreword

Simply put, forward means going toward, ahead, or advancing in some way.

For example: Going forward, we will have to work better as a team.

For example: I hope the Post Office will forward the mail to my new address.

Foreword is an introductory note or statement. This is often seen at the beginning of a book where someone writes something about the author and/or the book she is writing.

For example: I would love to have one of my favorite authors to write the foreword of my new soon-to-be-released book!

For example: Have you read the foreword to Jeff Goin’s latest book?

What is most tricky about the two words is the spelling because forward has no “e” and has an “a,” whereas foreword adds an “e” and has an “o.”  There is no real trick to remember the spellings for each, but for some reason, when I see or write the word “foreword” I picture a golfer calling out “fore!” LOL! It may be goofy but it helps me and maybe it will help you too. 🙂

Next Steps

For more grammar and writing tips, tricks, and exclusive content sign up for the email list.

For information about my proofreading and coaching services visit the work with me page.

It’s June 1st. How is Your Year Going?

Can you believe that we are half way through 2017? It is crazy how time is flying by so fast! I think it is a good time to take a look at how things are going and revamp some things.

It is funny how everyone makes goals and plans in January just to abandon them a couple (or few) months later. But, the thing is, every day is a chance for a new beginning – and so is every month or quarter. So let me encourage you: If you have made plans or goals in January that haven’t planned out, take a little time to create new ones or to tweak the old ones.

Every Day is a New Beginning

For me, this year is not panning out like I had planned at all. In some ways, I feel really behind but in other ways I feel like I am growing and evolving, which is a good thing!

My word for 2017 is courage. I thought that meant doing certain things for growing my business but it has turned out to be more personal. It was a tough school year for my son, especially academically, and we had to navigate and adjust to the challenge. It wasn’t easy but we got through it! On top of that, Andrew had a lot of activities and events – as well as other events in our family – which forced me out of my introverted self a lot of the time.

Business wise, it has been interesting too. I haven’t spent much time here on the blog like I had expected, but at the same time, I have been growing my personal blog in ways I didn’t expect. I started a coaching mentoring program and am beginning to offer personal life coaching! This is definitely out of my comfort zone but also rewarding. It has been on my heart for a long time and so I will follow the prompting for as long as it leads.

What does that mean for carolda.com? Not much. Writing is in my blood and so is proofreading and editing so I will continue with those! I can’t imagine giving up this part of my life. And, since I have the space to continue with these endeavors, I will. 🙂

I would love to hear from you. Is 2017 shaping up the way you expect? Is it better than you expected or have you been thrown a curve ball or two? How will you tweak the rest of the year to make it what you want it to be?

Next Steps

For more grammar and writing tips, tricks, and exclusive content sign up for the email list.

For information about my proofreading and coaching services visit the work with me page.

Misused Words: Aloud vs Allowed

In context, you know what these words are but in writing they are often misspelled, so here is a little refresher:

Misused Words Aloud vs Allowed

Aloud means to use the voice or making noise or sound with the voice.

For example: Nathan voiced his opinion aloud.

For example: Ruth likes to read  aloud to the children.

Allowed is the past tense of allow (a verb) which means to permit or give permission to.

For example: The author allowed her fans to get a sneak peek of her upcoming book.

For example: The plugins allowed for greater usability of the website.

That’s it.  🙂

Next Steps

For more grammar and writing tips, tricks, and exclusive content sign up for the email list.

For information about my proofreading and coaching services visit the work with me page.