Misused Words: Adverse vs Averse

These words are very similar but there are some slight differences.

Adverse means something that is dangerous, unfavorable, or contrary. It is used with things not people. It is often used in describing the weather.

For example: There may be adverse weather conditions during our vacation.

For example: Certain pharmaceutical drugs can have adverse effects on the body.

Averse means having a strong repugnance or dislike for something.

For example: Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely averse to taking a cruise.

For example: She is not averse to completely revamping her story’s plot.

These two words are a little tricky. Just keep in mind that adverse is used in regards to things, not people. Adverse is never used in relations to people. Averse is most often followed by the word “to.” Also, you know averse is used correctly if you can substitute the work with “opposed” or “dislike.”

In both examples above, you can easily change averse to opposed. “Much to my husband’s dismay, I am completely opposed to taking a cruise.” “She is not opposed to completely revamping her story’s plot.”

Next Steps

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Thinking of Writing Your Memoir?

Jane Friedman has a guest post up that shows you how to write your memoir using lists! I *love* list and this looks completely doable. In fact, I can see using this technique for writing other types of books such as nonfiction and novels. Just switch the memories for scenes and/or topics, etc.

Here is a snippet:

“So you’ve got this life, and it’s an interesting one. It’s taught you a few things, and you’d like to share them with the rest of us. You know it, we know it: you need to write a memoir. Except…the mere thought floods you with anxiety. You’ve got decades of memories; where would you even start? Lists to the rescue! This step-by-step process will guide you through organizing and writing your memoir with a series of fun, easy list. 1. Get Your Mind Right… Continue Reading

 

Misused Words: Aloud vs Allowed

In context, you know what these words are but in writing they are often misspelled, so here is a little refresher:

Misused Words Aloud vs Allowed

Aloud means to use the voice or making noise or sound with the voice.

For example: Nathan voiced his opinion aloud.

For example: Ruth likes to read  aloud to the children.

Allowed is the past tense of allow (a verb) which means to permit or give permission to.

For example: The author allowed her fans to get a sneak peek of her upcoming book.

For example: The plugins allowed for greater usability of the website.

That’s it.  🙂

Next Steps

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For information about my proofreading and coaching services visit the work with me page.